Remembering people essays

Contra Dance / Contradance Essays . Collections of Essays Contra Dance, Beyond the Basics | Organizing Dances Dance People | Bob McQuillen | Dance History

On May 7, the New York Times reported that large numbers of uniformed police and plainclothes KGB agents were at Moscow’s Kievsky train station when trains arrived from Kyiv, mostly with children and elderly women. The officials were doing everything they could to prevent Western journalists from interviewing the arrivals. They ordered reporters to leave the station and turned away a television crew while whisking away the Ukrainian arrivals. But it was obvious that the West was aware of the panic that had set in, so the Kremlin began to release more doctored information. The bland reports that everything was under control morphed into graphic descriptions of the Motherland’s Finest fighting 100-foot high flames after the initial explosion. Again, Yurii Bohatiuk’s article translates the Soviet press describing the firemen’s efforts: “Their boots stuck in bitumen that melted because of high temperature, soot and smoke made it difficult to breathe, but the brave bold men kept on fighting the blaze courageously.” Still there was no mention of casualties or the risk to people still being exposed to large doses of radiation.

— Andrew C. McCarthy is a senior fellow at the   National Review Institute . He is the author, most recently, of   Spring Fever: The Illusion of Islamic Democracy .

Learn more

remembering people essays

Remembering people essays

Action Action

remembering people essays

Remembering people essays

Action Action

remembering people essays

Remembering people essays

— Andrew C. McCarthy is a senior fellow at the   National Review Institute . He is the author, most recently, of   Spring Fever: The Illusion of Islamic Democracy .

Action Action

remembering people essays
Remembering people essays

Action Action

Remembering people essays

Action Action

remembering people essays

Remembering people essays

On May 7, the New York Times reported that large numbers of uniformed police and plainclothes KGB agents were at Moscow’s Kievsky train station when trains arrived from Kyiv, mostly with children and elderly women. The officials were doing everything they could to prevent Western journalists from interviewing the arrivals. They ordered reporters to leave the station and turned away a television crew while whisking away the Ukrainian arrivals. But it was obvious that the West was aware of the panic that had set in, so the Kremlin began to release more doctored information. The bland reports that everything was under control morphed into graphic descriptions of the Motherland’s Finest fighting 100-foot high flames after the initial explosion. Again, Yurii Bohatiuk’s article translates the Soviet press describing the firemen’s efforts: “Their boots stuck in bitumen that melted because of high temperature, soot and smoke made it difficult to breathe, but the brave bold men kept on fighting the blaze courageously.” Still there was no mention of casualties or the risk to people still being exposed to large doses of radiation.

Action Action

remembering people essays

Remembering people essays

— Andrew C. McCarthy is a senior fellow at the   National Review Institute . He is the author, most recently, of   Spring Fever: The Illusion of Islamic Democracy .

Action Action

remembering people essays

Remembering people essays

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Second

Remembering people essays

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Third

Remembering people essays

Action Action

http://buy-steroids.org